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Poems About Racism And Discrimination Essays

The 2018 Colorism Healing Writing Contest is now open! Let’s challenge each other to face and express some of the hard truths about colorism. Whether or not you consider yourself a “writer” doesn’t matter. What matters is having the courage to stand in your truth, being brave enough and bold enough to speak out. If you’re ready, study the guidelines below and enter your writing by April 30th.

Deadline

11:59 p.m. CST on April 30, 2018

 

Judges

Donney Rose

Donney Rose  is a poet, teaching artist, and community activist from Baton Rouge. He works as a teaching artist and marketing director for an arts-based non-profit, Forward Arts Inc. Donney is the author of, The Crying Buck, an acclaimed chapbook of poetry that delves into Black masculinity and vulnerability through a critical lens. His work as a performance poet/writer has been featured on Atlanta Black Star, Blavity, Button Poetry, All Def Digital, Slam Find, 225 Magazine; and in the journals Drunk In A Midnight Choir and Gris Gris, Nicholls State’s literary journal. His work as a community activist has been highlighted by the BBC, Huffington Post, New York Times, Democracy Now, and The Advocate. He received the Humanitarian of the Year award at the 2016 New V Awards for promoting activism through his art and is a member of Baton Rouge Business Report’s 2017 “Forty Under 40” class.

Benjamin Washington

Benjamin Washington is a 23 year old Spoken Word artist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Since the age of 14, Benjamin has been involved in the spoken word scene starting from his sophomore year in high. In that time, Benjamin led Istrouma High School to back to back All-City Teen Poetry Slam Championships from 2011-2012, along with being selected as one of the “Top 6” youth poets to represent Baton Rouge at the Brave New Voices International Youth Poetry Slam in 2011. Upon graduating from Istrouma High School in 2013, Benjamin attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where he founded the campus organization, PowerfUL Poets. While serving as Founder and President, Benjamin led his team to a 1st Place victory in the Louisiana Collegiate Slam, which consisted of teams from Southern University in Baton Rouge, Grambling State University in Ruston, and Northwestern State University in Natchitoches. From that victory, Benjamin, along with two team members Jalen Shelvin and Dexter Portalis, formed the spoken word collective BlackSmith. In present day, Benjamin , along with his group BlackSmith, have been paving their own lane in the spoken word world. From opening up for the Mayor of Baton Rouge to packing 60+ people in a small coffee shop in Port Allen, Louisiana for their very first show, BlackSmith has been moving across the Louisiana area performing and receiving support in droves. Benjamin’s debut spoken word album “G3,” can be found on BandCamp at bandcamp.com/goodwrittenz.

Awards (apply to all divisions)

  • 1st Place: $75 plus publication online and in the 2018 print book
  • 2nd Place: $50 plus publication online and in the 2018 print book
  • 3rd Place: publication online and in the 2018 print book
  • Editor’s Pick: publication in the 2018 print book

Divisions

  • Youth Essay (ages 19 and younger)
  • Adult Essay (ages 20 and older)
  • Youth Poetry (ages 19 and younger)
  • Adult Poetry (ages 20 and older)

Contest Rules

  • We are looking for pieces that directly address the topic of colorism—defined as bias or discrimination against people based on how dark or light their skin tone, based on their hair texture, eye color, etc. in comparison to other people of their same race.  While other topics, including racism, are equally important, this contest is meant to provide a platform for specifically addressing colorism. The following links might be helpful in helping you determine if your essay or poem is the right fit for this contest:
  • Submit Essays of no more than 1250 words.
  • Submit Poems of no more than 1000 words.
  • You may submit 1-3 pieces.
  • We do not accept pieces that have already been published in print or online. (This does not include personal or private social media profiles or forums.)
  • You must be the original author of the essay or poem.
  • Family members of judges may enter the contest for publication, but will not qualify for cash prizes.
  • By submitting to the contest, you agree to have your writing published online and in print if it is selected.

 

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Telephone Conversation

  • Length: 740 words (2.1 double-spaced pages)
  • Rating: Excellent
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The poem 'Telephone conversation' is staged by a black man who is looking for a flat but ends up phoning to a landlady who is racist but tries to be polite in finding out whether he is he is a dark or light one. When he first speaks to her he feels awkward as he feels he has to confess that he is African. Also I think he feels as though he has been in the same position before somewhere else and he knows what is expected from people like the landlady he is speaking to. When he tells her that he is African she becomes speechless and wants to know if he is light or dark brown. She puts her words in a more polite way of asking but they are not to the point of what they could be which makes it more harder for the answers. His response to the question 'How dark?' 'Are you light or very dark?' is to get her back and deliberately embarrass her by putting in words of what she meant when she asked that question. When he answers the question this time he gives her a sarcastic answer that he just made up to be awkward. She then becomes stuck and wants an immediate answer as you can see by the tone of her voice. The poem also has a number of amusing lines to bring in some humour "by sitting down has turned my bottom black" Again when he gives her this information he is trying to embarrass her. The whole conversation seems like a war between then because she is racist and he gets her back by embarrassing her. The poem is very much like a play showing everyday life as a black person who wants to rend a room from a racist landlady. I think that the poem is quite effective as it is a more modern and day to day situation rather than "Strange Fruit". Both the poems are featured on racial prejudice. I think that the telephone conversation would be more effective because it is more modern and likely to happen than walking through some part of a country and finding black bodies swinging from trees

The poem 'Telephone conversation' is staged by a black man who is looking for a flat but ends up phoning to a landlady who is racist but tries to be polite in finding out whether he is he is a dark or light one.

How to Cite this Page

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"Telephone Conversation." 123HelpMe.com. 10 Mar 2018
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Related Searches

Strange Fruit         Telephone Conversation         Black Man         Landlady         Racial Prejudice         Immediate         Racist         Everyday Life         Answers        




When he first speaks to her he feels awkward as he feels he has to confess that he is African. Also I think he feels as though he has been in the same position before somewhere else and he knows what is expected from people like the landlady he is speaking to. When he tells her that he is African she becomes speechless and wants to know if he is light or dark brown. She puts her words in a more polite way of asking but they are not to the point of what they could be which makes it more harder for the answers. His response to the question 'How dark?' 'Are you light or very dark?' is to get her back and deliberately embarrass her by putting in words of what she meant when she asked that question. When he answers the question this time he gives her a sarcastic answer that he just made up to be awkward. She then becomes stuck and wants an immediate answer as you can see by the tone of her voice. The poem also has a number of amusing lines to bring in some humour "by sitting down has turned my bottom black" Again when he gives her this information he is trying to embarrass her. The whole conversation seems like a war between then because she is racist and he gets her back by embarrassing her. The poem is very much like a play showing everyday life as a black person who wants to rend a room from a racist landlady. I think that the poem is quite effective as it is a more modern and day to day situation rather than "Strange Fruit". Both the poems are featured on racial prejudice. I think that the telephone conversation would be more effective because it is more modern and likely to happen than walking through some part of a country and finding black bodies swinging from trees




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