Story Type Essay Online

Narrative Essay Topics

In a narrative essay, the writer tells a story about his/her personal experience. However, treating a narrative essay like an interesting bedtime story would be a mistake. It goes further. In this type of essay, the writer should speak about his/her experience within a specific context, such as a lesson learned. With a narrative essay, the writer not only entertains the reader but also teaches him, illustrating his point of view with a real-life example.


If you are assigned to write a narrative essay, here are some narrative writing prompts:

NARRATIVE ESSAY WRITING


How to Choose a Narrative Essay Topic?

Choosing an interesting topic and thinking over short story ideas is particularly important. When writing a narrative essay you should think about your life experience in the framework of the assignment’s theme, you would like to speak about. You should always remember that even a tiny event or incident could serve a plot for an interesting narrative story. The point is that it should convey a meaning; it should be a kind of instructive story.

There is a number of helpful techniques helping to invent an essay topic. If you don’t have a clue what experience to describe, you can brainstorm with your friends, surf the Internet or use this list of sample narrative essay topics.


Before getting started to choose a topic from the list provided by our writers, let’s read one of the narrative essay examples:

NARRATIVE ESSAY EXAMPLE


In case you already have the topic to write about but need help with your essay, you can contact our essay writing service in UK to order a custom-written narrative essay with www.essaymasters.co.uk! Our professional writers are available 24/7! 

Below is the great list of short story ideas:

TOP 70 Narrative Essay Topics

  1. If I could go back in time.
  2. If I could change anything in the history, what would I choose?
  3. The time I saw the weirdest thing in my life.
  4. My most frightening experience.
  5. One thing I’m afraid to lose.
  6. If I could change one thing about me.
  7. If I had a billion dollars.
  8. If I could stop the time.
  9. The most beautiful thing in the world for me.
  10. The most pleasant sound for me.
  11. My first day at a new school.
  12. The time I lost my friend.
  13. The time I got a new friend.
  14. My first day at a new job.
  15. My most disastrous day ever.
  16. My happiest day ever.
  17. The most irritating things in my life.
  18. An experience that left me disillusioned.
  19. How I met my fear.
  20. The moment I overcome my phobia.
  21. The achievement I’m proud of.
  22. My most dangerous experience.
  23. The journey that has changed me.
  24. The experience that taught me how appearance can be deceiving.
  25. My act of heroism.
  26. My act of cowardice.
  27. A thing I would like to change in my past.
  28. My first month of living on my own.
  29. The most successful day in my life.
  30. The time I was wrong about the person.
  31. My sudden act of a kindness.
  32. What my younger sibling taught me.
  33. A time when I felt that I’m experiencing a historic event.
  34. How I started relationships.
  35. The worst quarrel with my mother.
  36. An experience I thought I would never have.
  37. The biggest risk I’ve ever taken.
  38. Why do I like being alone?
  39. The hardest decision I’ve ever made.
  40. The hardest thing I’ve ever done.
  41. What challenges have I overcome?
  42. How do I relieve stress?
  43. What do I do when I feel depressed.
  44. 5 everyday problems that bother me.
  45. Who inspires me and why.
  46. Whom would I ask to come if I had my own Talk-show?
  47. People that have changed my life.
  48. Books or movies that have changed my world view.
  49. Devices playing the biggest role in my life.
  50. Side effects of my digital life.
  51. One day or week without an access to the Internet.
  52. What my profile in social networks tells about me.
  53. What music inspires me.
  54. What music can change my mood?
  55. What movies inspire me.
  56. What role television plays in my life.
  57. What television shows have mattered to me?
  58. What reality-show I would like to participate in.
  59. What memorable poetry have I learned?
  60. What books teach me.
  61. Why do I keep (or don’t keep) a diary or journal?
  62. What words or phrases I don’t like to use.
  63. The time I learned that grammar is necessary.
  64. The greatest conversation of my life.
  65. The teacher who inspired me.
  66. The role clubs and teams play in my life.
  67. My long-time passion.
  68. What superhero power I would like to have.
  69. Why I like (or don’t like) cooking.
  70. Waiting in line story.

More about a narrative essay:

NARRATIVE ESSAY OUTLINE


Have you already chosen a topic for your narrative essay? If not, feel free to contact our professional writers as they will offer a lot of topics to write about. Place an order for getting an instant quote for your narrative essay.

As a mode of expository writing, the narrative approach, more than any other, offers writers a chance to think and write about themselves. We all have experiences lodged in our memories, which are worthy of sharing with readers. Yet sometimes they are so fused with other memories that a lot of the time spent in writing narrative is in the prewriting stage.

When you write a narrative essay, you are telling a story. Narrative essays are told from a defined point of view, often the author's, so there is feeling as well as specific and often sensory details provided to get the reader involved in the elements and sequence of the story. The verbs are vivid and precise. The narrative essay makes a point and that point is often defined in the opening sentence, but can also be found as the last sentence in the opening paragraph.

Since a narrative relies on personal experiences, it often is in the form of a story. When the writer uses this technique, he or she must be sure to include all the conventions of storytelling: plot, character, setting, climax, and ending. It is usually filled with details that are carefully selected to explain, support, or embellish the story. All of the details relate to the main point the writer is attempting to make.

To summarize, the narrative essay

  • is told from a particular point of view
  • makes and supports a point
  • is filled with precise detail
  • uses vivid verbs and modifiers
  • uses conflict and sequence as does any story
  • may use dialogue

The purpose of a narrative report is to describe something. Many students write narrative reports thinking that these are college essays or papers. While the information in these reports is basic to other forms of writing, narrative reports lack the "higher order thinking" that essays require. Thus narrative reports do not, as a rule, yield high grades for many college courses. A basic example of a narrative report is a "book report" that outlines a book; it includes the characters, their actions, possibly the plot, and, perhaps, some scenes. That is, it is a description of "what happens in the book." But this leaves out an awful lot.

What is left out is what the book or article is about -- the underlying concepts, assumptions, arguments, or point of view that the book or article expresses. A narrative report leaves aside a discussion that puts the events of the text into the context of what the text is about. Is the text about love? Life in the fast lane? Society? Wealth and power? Poverty? In other words, narrative reports often overlook the authors purpose or point of view expressed through the book or article.

Once an incident is chosen, the writer should keep three principles in mind.

  1. Remember to involve readers in the story. It is much more interesting to actually recreate an incident for readers than to simply tell about it.
  2. Find a generalization, which the story supports. This is the only way the writer's personal experience will take on meaning for readers. This generalization does not have to encompass humanity as a whole; it can concern the writer, men, women, or children of various ages and backgrounds.
  3. Remember that although the main component of a narrative is the story, details must be carefully selected to support, explain, and enhance the story.

Conventions of Narrative Essays

In writing your narrative essay, keep the following conventions in mind.

  • Narratives are generally written in the first person, that is, using I. However, third person (he, she, or it) can also be used.
  • Narratives rely on concrete, sensory details to convey their point. These details should create a unified, forceful effect, a dominant impression. More information on the use of specific details is available on another page.
  • Narratives, as stories, should include these story conventions: a plot, including setting and characters; a climax; and an ending.

Here are some popular essay topic examples for your narrative essay type:

  • First Day at College
  • The Moment of Success
  • A Memorable Journey
  • ...

The essay topic you choose should be interesting and important to you, because the best essays are written on the topics that really matter to the writer.

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