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World Doublespeak Essay

"William Lutz" redirects here. For the football player, see Wil Lutz.

William D. Lutz (; born 12 December 1940) is an American linguist who specializes in the use of plain language and the avoidance of doublespeak (deceptive language). He wrote a famous essay The World of Doublespeak on this subject as well as the book Doublespeak[1] His original essay and the book described the four different types of doublespeak (euphemism, jargon, gobbledygook, and inflated language) and the social dangers of doublespeak.

Biography[edit]

In 1962, Lutz received his bachelor's degree from the Dominican College of Racine (which closed its doors in 1974). He received his masters degree in English from Marquette University in 1963 and his doctorate in 1971 from the University of Nevada, Reno. Lutz began teaching English at Rutgers University-Camden in 1971, and was made a full professor in 1991. He retired from teaching in 2006.[2]

From 1980 to 1994 Lutz edited the, now defunct, Quarterly Review of Doublespeak.[3][4] He worked as a consultant with a number of corporations and the United States government to promote the use of 'plain language'. For example, he was a significant contributor to the SEC's Plain English Handbook.[5]

Selected publications[edit]

  • (1974) The Age of Communication[6]
  • (1989) Doublespeak: From "Revenue Enhancement" to "Terminal Living"[1]
  • (1994) The Cambridge Thesaurus of American English[7]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • (1978) Contemporary Authors: A bio-bibliographical guide to current writers in fiction, general nonfiction, poetry, journalism, drama, motion pictures, television, and other fields Volumes 33-36, 1st revision, Gale Research, Detroit,

External links[edit]

  1. ^ abLutz, William D. (1989) Doublespeak: From "Revenue Enhancement" to "Terminal Living": How Government, Business, Advertisers, and Others Use Language to Deceive YouHarper & Row, New York, ISBN 0-06-016134-5
  2. ^"Retirements of Marie Cornelia and Robert Ryan" The Phoenix Spring 2006, page 1
  3. ^"Magazine Reviews:Quarterly Review of Doublespeak" Chip's Closet Cleaner
  4. ^"William D. Lutz" NNDB
  5. ^United States Securities and Exchange Commission (1998) A plain English handbook: how to create clear SEC disclosure documents Office of Investor Education and Assistance, United States. Securities and Exchange Commission, Washington, DC, OCLC 36595293
  6. ^Lutz, William D. (1974) The Age of Communication Goodyear Pub. Co., Pacific Palisades, California, ISBN 0-87620-013-7
  7. ^Lutz, William D. (1994) The Cambridge Thesaurus of American English Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, ISBN 0-521-41427-X

Doublespeak is the language of non-responsibility, carefully constructed to appear to communicate when it fact it doesn’t. In this lively and eye-opening expose, originally published in 1989, linguist William Lutz identifies the four most common types of doublespeak—euphemism, jargon, gobbledygook or “bureaucratese,” and inflated language—showing how each is used in business, advertising, medicine, government, and the military. In this seminal book, Lutz articulates that the goal of doublespeak is “to distort reality and corrupt thought.” Featuring a new introduction by Lutz, Doublespeak is the first title in Ig’s new “Rebel Reads” series.

William Lutz is an American linguist who specializes in the use of plain language and the avoidance of doublespeak (deceptive language). He wrote a famous essay “The World of Doublespeak” on this subject as well as the book Doublespeak, which described the four different types of doublespeak (euphemism, jargon, gobbledygook, and inflated language) and the social dangers of doublespeak.

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