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Free to Read Articles from June 2000 Part 2

  • HORSE RACING; Frankel Says His Horse Is a Natural
  • In Crippled Afghanistan, a Torturing Drought
  • In Sickness and in Health, and Now, in Jail
  • The Inclining Laptop
  • India's Creaky Courts
  • INSIDE
  • Interest Is Added To Settlement
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS; $105 Million Lysine Fine Set in Europe
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS; Indonesia Banking Chief Defies Calls for His Suspension
  • Investors File Suit Against Jenny Craig
  • JAZZ FESTIVAL REVIEW; Constant Connection In a Sea Of Choppy Currents
  • Jobs in Technology
  • Jobs With Links To Internet Soar
  • Laser Built for Israel Shoots Down Missile in Successful Test
  • Lawsuit Accuses Fashion House of Running Sweatshops
  • Leaders From Other Professions Reshape America's Schools, From Top to Bottom
  • LIVING IN A NUTSHELL; A Tower Rises Above Trouble
  • LIVING IN A NUTSHELL; Grand Gestures in Tiny Spaces
  • LIVING IN A NUTSHELL; Living Large In Little Apple
  • LIVING IN A NUTSHELL; Shangri-La in a Shack
  • LIVING IN A NUTSHELL; Trailer Poseurs: From Cabanas to Offices
  • MAKING BOOKS; Literary Titans Face Reality
  • Man Charged in Killing From Civil Rights Era
  • THE MARKETS: COMMODITIES
  • THE MARKETS: CURRENCIES
  • THE MARKETS; Key Rates
  • THE MARKETS: Market Place; Microsoft in the Court of the Investor
  • THE MARKETS: STOCKS; Shares Rally on the Hope the Fed Will Hold Steady
  • Matters of Life and Death; A Prizewinning Writer Holds Onto His Day Job as a Funeral Director
  • Mayor Tried To See Family Of Dorismond
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Accounts
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; New Agency Posts For the Americas
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Top Effie Award Goes to Apple
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING; Some experts of spin offer advice to Microsoft on how to reach consumers' hearts and minds.
  • METRO BRIEFING: NEW YORK
  • Metro Business; Online Registration For E-ZPass Doubles
  • Metro Business; Oyster Aid Is Questioned
  • Metro Business; Painless Needle Approved
  • Metro Matters; No Level Field For Athletes In Schools
  • M.T.A. Said to Run Late in Answering Complaints
  • MUSIC REVIEW; Foundation For the Joy Of Song And Life
  • Navy Pilot's Fate in Gulf War to Be Studied
  • Necessary Deceptions
  • New Cable Channel Halts Production of 2 Programs
  • New Jersey's Excessive Senate Race
  • NEWS SUMMARY
  • NEWS WATCH; A Gallery of Glimpses Of the Martian Surface
  • NEWS WATCH; Find Old Books on the Web, Then Prepare to Pay the Price
  • NEWS WATCH; HOLD THE PHONE
  • NEWS WATCH; Human Touch Still Important In College Search, Poll Finds
  • NEWS WATCH; JamCam 3.0 and Jam-It For Pictures and Sound
  • No, I'm Not Talking to You
  • Official Accused Of Stealing Millions
  • Olympic Torch Begins Its Journey in Australia
  • On the Waterfront: Parks and Big Dreams
  • ONLINE SHOPPER; At Failing E-Stores It's Vulture Beware
  • Paid Notice: Deaths BECKENSTEIN, ROBERT
  • Paid Notice: Deaths BROWN, NATALIE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths CLARK, BLAIR
  • Paid Notice: Deaths COHANE, JOHN F.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths DEL TREDICI, HELEN
  • Paid Notice: Deaths DULLEA, JEFF
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FEDER, SAMUEL LAMIE, M.D.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FINE, ROSE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FINKELSTEIN, AARON
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GORDON, BERNARD
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GRAFF, JOSEPH
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GREENSPAN, HERMAN
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GUTHERY, FRANK F.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HACKMYER, ARNOLD A.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HALBREICH, HARRIET (NEE SPORN)
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HARM, MARY GAY
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HYMAN, MORRIS D.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths IRGANG, FRANCES
  • Paid Notice: Deaths KASELL, SYD
  • Paid Notice: Deaths KING, DEBORAH, M.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LANDEGGER, CECILIA
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MARSHALL, JERROLD M.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MULQUEEN, REV. JOHN C.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths NOLAN, RAYMOND E.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths RAND, PHYLLIS MCELHONE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths RAVIV, DORON
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SIMON, WILLIAM E.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SMITH, MARY THORNTON
  • Paid Notice: Deaths STIEPLEMAN, JACK
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SUNFIST, LEON
  • Paid Notice: Deaths ZARNOWITZ, LENA
  • Paid Notice: Deaths ZOLDESSY, ANN
  • Paid Notice: Memorials CAMHI, STEPHEN B.
  • Paid Notice: Memorials KONIGSBERG, NATALIE
  • Park Plan Gets $64 Million Pledge
  • PERSONAL SHOPPER: LIVING IN A NUTSHELL; Sweet Dreams in Narrow Spaces
  • PLUS: BOXING; De La Hoya Says He Learned Lesson
  • PLUS: COLLEGE BASKETBALL -- PROVIDENCE; Former Players Indicted for Fight
  • PLUS: HOCKEY; Lowe and the Oilers Set Another Meeting
  • PLUS: SOCCER -- EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS; Matthaus Worsens His Thigh Injury
  • PLUS: TRACK AND FIELD; Mitchell Wins 100 As Greene Sits Out
  • PLUS: W.N.B.A.; Johnson Sparks Liberty on the Road
  • Political Turmoil in Israel
  • POP REVIEW; Break the Beats, Watch 'Em Crackle
  • PRIMARY IN NEW JERSEY: THE HOUSE; Effort to Oust Republican Falls Short, But Not Far
  • PRIMARY IN NEW JERSEY: THE LOSER; For Florio, His Days as the 'Comeback Kid' May Be Over
  • PRIMARY IN NEW JERSEY: THE OVERVIEW; Campaigns Quickly Stake Their Ground
  • PRIMARY IN NEW JERSEY: THE REPUBLICAN; G.O.P. Senate Candidate Offers Regular-Joe Image
  • PRO BASKETBALL; A Rivalry Renewed For Bird and Johnson
  • PRO BASKETBALL: N.B.A. FINALS -- LAKERS VS. PACERS; O'Neal Ruins Pacers' Plans: He Runs Free In a Solo Show
  • PRO BASKETBALL; Williams's Career With Nets Is in Doubt
  • PRO BASKETBALL; Wizards Want Hamilton and Await Word
  • Prosecutors Describe Overdrafts by Pirro
  • PUBLIC LIVES
  • PUBLIC LIVES; A 'Guy With the Gold' Is Still Making Rules
  • Q & A; Adding Fonts to Increase A Computer's Repertory
  • QUOTATION OF THE DAY
  • Race Analysis Cites Disparity In Sentencing For Narcotics
  • Rap Singer Arraigned
  • Reading Scores Improve Citywide; Still, Only 41% Meet Standards
  • RESIDENTIAL SALES
  • REVIEW; When Mohammed Can't Get to the Museum
  • Richard Meier in the Boroughs
  • Rights Group Says NATO Bombing in Yugoslavia Violated Law
  • Rounding Up a Pair of Mules
  • Ruling Stirs A Chat Frenzy
  • Salon Dismisses 13 Workers In Effort to Fight Shortfall
  • The Secret Life of the Home Computer
  • Senate Votes to Extend Ban on Nuclear Cuts
  • Software Makers Ask for Protection From Internet Piracy
  • SpiderCam Coming to the World Wide Web
  • Sports of The Times
  • Stardom's Lure: Teenage Webmaster With Adult Ambitions
  • STATE OF THE ART; Neither Notebook Nor Palm
  • State Plans Tougher Vocational Curriculums
  • Stern Justice for Microsoft
  • Strings for Spring
  • Suicide Bomber Kills Official And 20 Others in Sri Lanka
  • Support Sought On Reviving Spanish-Dutch Phone Merger
  • Surge Protection Subtleties
  • TELEVISION REVIEW; And the Winner for Shortest Awards Show Is . . .
  • Tell the Truth About Altered Food
  • Tell the Truth About Altered Food; Better and Fresher
  • Tell the Truth About Altered Food; Profits, Not Health
  • TENNIS; Norman Inches Closer To French Open Title
  • Tiffany Plans More Stores
  • Tired of Palm Reading
  • Tokyo Journal; In E-Mail Wrinkle, Cell Phones Are Chatterboxes
  • TRANSACTIONS
  • Turkey Considers Scaling Back Military Challenge to Greece
  • Turmoil in Israel
  • Turtles in Danger
  • United States Sends Cuban Athlete Home
  • U.S. May Forgo Hearings on Egyptair Crash
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: CONSUMERS; Most PC Users Are Unlikely to Abandon Company's Products Despite Ruling
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT; Gates's Statement: The First Day of the Rest of the Case
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: POLITICS; Muted Comments Avoid Criticizing the Defendant
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: THE COMPANY; Gates Says the Court Fight Has Just Begun
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: THE INDUSTRY; In Silicon Valley, Ruling Won't Change Culture
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: THE LAW; If Microsoft Is Sawed in Half
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: THE REMEDY; The Government Breakup Plan: How It Will Work
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT; The Text of the Order To Split Up Microsoft
  • U.S. VS. MIRCROSOFT; MORE ON THE DECISION
  • U.S. VS. MIRCROSOFT: THE APPEAL; After a Rout, Still Fighting
  • U.S. VS. MIRCROSOFT: THE OVERVIEW; MICROSOFT BREAKUP IS ORDERED FOR ANTITRUST LAW VIOLATIONS
  • Viruses Could Have Your Number
  • Weather on the Web
  • WHAT'S NEXT; Radio-Frequency Tags Could Pierce Some of the Fog of War
  • With Only Their Wits, Part II
  • World Briefing
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: AMERICAS; AIR CANADA STRIKE POSSIBLE
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: AMERICAS; BIG DEMAND FOR BRAZIL OIL SITES
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: ASIA; KOREA TO MERGE TROUBLED BANKS
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: ASIA; LOVE BUG CHARGES DISMISSED
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: ASIA; NEW SINGAPORE NEWSPAPERS
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; AN OLIVETTI MOVE ON BOND INTEREST
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; CHELLO OFFERING POSTPONED
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; NO CHANGE IN BRITISH RATES
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; PHILIPS TO SELL STAKE IN ASM
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; RUSSIA TAX REFORM ADVANCES
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; TELECOM ITALIA BID DEFENDED
  • The World of Microsoft
  • Xerox Patent Suit Against 3Com Is Dismissed
  • Yielding to Embarassed F.C.C., AT&T Delays Its Rate Increase
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN; Campaign Briefing
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: CAMPAIGN BRIEFING; TODAY'S SCHEDULES
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: CAMPAIGN C.E.O. -- A special report.; Gore Dots the i's That Bush Leaves to Others
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE AD CAMPAIGN; A Young Bush Is the Star In Ads Set for New York
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE CONFIDANT; New Duty for the Democrats' Main Money Man: Running the Convention
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE TEXAS GOVERNOR; Bush Proposes Restructured Budget Process And Other Policy Changes to End Gridlock
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE VICE PRESIDENT; Gore Plans Tour on Prosperity Issues
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN; Where the Candidates Turn for Some Advice
  • A Parrot Mystery
  • A Pattern of Unsolved Greek Terrorism Cases
  • A Vote Against Secret Spending
  • Agreement to Balance Budget Eludes Officials in Nassau
  • Albany Agrees On Plan to Aid Nassau County
  • Amazon Preparing Third European Site
  • Antimissile Testing Is Rigged To Hide a Flaw, Critics Say
  • ANTIQUES; Ancient Pots As Storytellers
  • ART GUIDE
  • ART IN REVIEW; 'Define ''Context'' '
  • ART IN REVIEW; 'Extra Ordinary'
  • ART IN REVIEW; 'God Bless America'
  • ART IN REVIEW; Andy Goldsworthy
  • ART IN REVIEW; Donald Judd
  • ART IN REVIEW; Ignacio Iturria
  • ART IN REVIEW; Katharina Fritsch
  • ART IN REVIEW; Malerie Marder
  • ART IN REVIEW; Shahzia Sikander
  • ART REVIEW; Untrained but Inspired, Hands Dreamed in Stone
  • AT THE MOVIES; The Lullaby Of Barnyards
  • Attacking Hate Crimes
  • BALLET REVIEW; An Enigma As Cerebral As It Is Unexpected
  • Bank Puts Its Money, and Its Name, on Staten Island Ballpark
  • Bankruptcy Law and Violence
  • BASEBALL: LAST NIGHT; Martinez Pitches a Gem
  • BASEBALL; Mets at Yanks: A Lot of Shakin' Going On
  • BASEBALL; Rocker Finally Shows Up For Assignment in Minors
  • BASEBALL; Round Trip Ends Orioles' Long Trip
  • Bear or Human: Who's Invading Whom?
  • Behind a Solemn Rite for Obuchi, a Burst of Politicking
  • Big Carmakers Extend Benefits To Gay Couples
  • Bill Thomas, 79, Film Costume Designer, Dies
  • BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Call Him Ishmael: The Young (Heartbroken and Lonely) Man and the Sea
  • Brazil Opens Files on Region's Abuses in Age of Dictators
  • Britain Tries To Reassure Sierra Leone Before Pullout
  • British Attache Is Assassinated On Greek Street
  • Broadcaster in Deal For 9 TV Stations
  • BUSINESS DIGEST
  • CABARET GUIDE
  • CABARET REVIEW; Balancing Warmth With Reserve as She Sings of Love
  • Calgary Journal; In the Catbird Seat (or the Hot Seat, Like Seattle?)
  • CBS's 'Early Show' Draws Complaints, Not Crowds
  • Central Park Fear
  • Cerebral Enigma
  • CLASSICAL MUSIC AND DANCE GUIDE
  • Coke Is Again Hiring After Revamping
  • Commencement; Hold On to Individuality, Levy Advises
  • COMPANY BRIEFS
  • COMPANY NEWS; BUYITNOW.COM AND PCWONDERS.COM SAY THEY WILL MERGE
  • COMPANY NEWS; EARTHLINK AGREES TO BUY ONEMAIN.COM FOR $308 MILLION
  • COMPANY NEWS; FLUOR SAYS ITS BOARD HAS APPROVED PLAN FOR A SPINOFF
  • COMPANY NEWS; GO.COM IS SELLING ULTRASEEK TO INKTOMI FOR $344 MILLION
  • COMPANY NEWS; LIBERTY FINANCIAL SAYS IT IS HAVING TALKS WITH WANGER
  • COMPANY NEWS; MOLECULAR DEVICES AGREES TO ACQUIRE LJL BIOSYSTEMS
  • COMPANY NEWS; NATIONAL CITY SAYS IT SOLD $2 BILLION IN STUDENT LOANS
  • COMPANY NEWS; PECO ENERGY IS BUYING FOUR CONTRACTORS FOR $95 MILLION
  • COMPANY NEWS; SOUTHERN IS BUYING FOUR PLANTS FROM POTOMAC
  • COMPANY NEWS; TROY AGREES TO PAY $90 MILLION FOR CATSKILL FINANCIAL
  • Corrections
  • Court Orders Medicaid Care Despite Assets
  • Cox Radio Sets Deal for Atlanta Station
  • CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; The Stories Vs. the Steps
  • DANCE REVIEW; Baryshnikov & Co., Toying With Ideas
  • D-Day, Over Here
  • Death Toll in Congo's 2-Year War Is at Least 1.7 Million, Study Says
  • DINER'S JOURNAL
  • Direct Deposit Used to Embezzle $7 Million
  • Documentarians Become Talking Heads for a Change
  • Don Klosterman, 70, Builder Of Many Pro Football Teams
  • Dorismonds Are Skeptical About Meeting With Mayor
  • Double Talk on Phone Rates
  • Drug Dealer Found Guilty in Murder of Child Witness
  • EATING OUT
  • Editors' Note
  • E.P.A., Citing Risks to Children, Signs Accord to Limit Insecticide
  • EXECUTIVE CHANGES
  • Ex-Trader Cleared of Charges
  • Facing the Ghost of Summers Past; Hope Dies Hard at Coney Island, and So Does Nostalgia
  • FAMILY FARE; The Prince In the Tower
  • The Fat on H.M.O.'s
  • FILM REVIEW; Against All Odds, a Haven For the Youngest Refugees
  • FILM REVIEW; Divining the Ways of God and Man: 10 Stories Rooted in Commandments
  • FILM REVIEW; Faithful Homage (Crash! Kapow!)
  • FILM REVIEW; From Blaxploitation Stereotype to Man on the Street
  • FILM REVIEW; Into the Night, Endlessly Searching for the Perfect Rave
  • FILM REVIEW; Selling Books on the Street in a Quality-of-Life Town
  • FILM REVIEW; Serving the Empire, One After Another After . . .
  • FILM REVIEW; Ties (and Bungee Cords) That Bind
  • FILM REVIEW; What Say You, My Lords? You'd Rather Charleston?
  • Florida Inmate Claimed Abuse in Execution
  • Foreign Affairs; The Young And the Clueless
  • Fresh Signs of Consolidation in Newspaper Industry
  • Future of Collector Cars: On the Auction Block, or Online?
  • Gates Foundation Names 4,100 for Minority Scholarships in 2-Decade Program
  • Gay Pride Day Is Observed By About 60 C.I.A. Workers
  • GOLF: NOTEBOOK; A Golfer Chugs Along, Carving Out a Living
  • GOLF: ROUNDUP; Jang Shares the Lead
  • Government Reports Decline in Import Prices
  • HOME VIDEO; A Complex Film In a Plain Wrap
  • HORSE RACING; Globalize Primed for an Upset
  • HORSE RACING; Stakes Will Still Be High at Belmont
  • In New York's War on Bugs, A Call for New Ammunition
  • INSIDE
  • INSIDE ART; Sotheby's Plans Web Auction
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: CURRENCIES; Europe's Central Bank Acts To Raise Inflation Barrier
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS; Japan G.D.P. Rises 2.4%, Ending 6-Month Slide
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS; Seeking Energy Self-Reliance, Brazil Auctions 21 Oil Licenses
  • I.R.S. Challenged Few Pirro Deductions
  • Jack Kroll, 74; Editor and Critic Shaped Newsweek's Art Coverage
  • Jeff MacNelly, 52, Cartoonist Who Created 'Shoe,' Is Dead
  • Justice Dept. Memo Says Donor Was Cleared
  • Last Manager Set to Leave Soros Fund
  • Lights, Camera, Streaming Video; Traditional Hollywood Exploring Dot-Com Entertainment
  • Man Held in Killing of Police Chief's Relative
  • Man's Farm Reveals Unsavory Secret
  • THE MARKETS: COMMODITIES
  • THE MARKETS; Key Rates
  • THE MARKETS: STOCKS & BONDS; Share Prices Retreat Over Corporate Earnings Concerns
  • McCall Says Giuliani Administration Is Defying Court Order to Assist State Audits
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Accounts
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Chicago Agencies Win Addy Awards
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Fallon Is Honored For Commercials
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; People
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Three Companies Pick AG Worldwide
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA; Wolf Group Fills A Top Position
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING; A big new Internet services company is determined to make its entry with a splash.
  • Metro Briefing
  • Metro Business; Conseco May Sell Tower
  • Metro Business; JetBlue to Fly to California
  • Metro Business; Morgan Stanley Looks to Jersey City
  • Michael Dell Sells 1.4 Million of His Shares
  • Microsoft Breakup: A Serious Mistake
  • Milton Freeman, 88; Wrote Securities Fraud Law
  • Mobile-Phone Emissions Study Planned
  • Monaco's Top 5 Sales (and a Rusty Maserati)
  • Money You Can Rely On
  • MOVIE GUIDE
  • National Semiconductor's Fourth-Quarter Earnings Exceeded Expectations
  • N.B.A. FINALS: LAKERS VS. PACERS; Pacers Are Confident Despite Game 1 Misfire
  • NEW VIDEO RELEASES
  • NEWS SUMMARY
  • NYC; Deprived Of a Chance For Virtue
  • On a Mission of Delight
  • ON BASEBALL; Leiter Views Rivalry From Both Sides Now
  • ON PRO BASKETBALL; O'Neal's Dominance Continues to Grow
  • ON STAGE AND OFF; A 'Full Monty,' Buffalo Style
  • Paid Notice: Deaths AUERBACH, SYLVIA ''SALLY''.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths BEDNAR, ROXANE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths BLOOR, JAMES
  • Paid Notice: Deaths CARTER, CLARENCE HOLBROOK.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths CHOILY, BERNARD ''BABE''.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths CIPOLLA, CHARLES W.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths CLARK, BLAIR
  • Paid Notice: Deaths DEAN, JACQUE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FODOR, SCHWARZ, RENEE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FURMAN, MARY H.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GORODY, TONY
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GREENFIELD, BERTHA
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HALBREICH, HARRIET
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HARM, MARY GAY.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HARTIGAN, ROSEMARY E.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HELLER, EVELYN F.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LAMONTE, JAMES
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LANDEGGER, CECILIA
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LIPTON, MYLES LOWELL.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MILSTOC, MAYER, M. D.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths NATHANSON, TED
  • Paid Notice: Deaths REISMAN, ETHEL I.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SPATZ, NATALIE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths STIEPLEMAN, JACK
  • Paid Notice: Deaths VISHNER, ESTHER DOBKIN.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths WHITE, ROSEMARY KITTELTON.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths WOHL, DAVID L.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths ZAUDERER, JEROME
  • Panama Still Failing to Stem Narcotics Traffic, U.S. Report Asserts
  • Parking Rules
  • Paulson Hopes Fast Start Leads to Successful Finish
  • Pet Shop Owners Are Accused Of Producing Fighting Birds
  • Petter Lindstrom, 93, Surgeon and Bergman's Spouse in '50 Scandal
  • PF.Net Chooses Chairman
  • PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW; Past Their Targets, to a Wry Truth
  • PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW; Stoop Dreams: The City as the Poor Child's Living Room and Playground
  • PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW; The Chillingly Fine Line Between Ecstasy and Grief
  • PLUS: HOCKEY -- PHILADELPHIA; Ramsay Named To Coach Flyers
  • PLUS: OLYMPICS; Auriemma Chosen As Assistant Coach
  • PLUS: PRO BASKETBALL -- LIBERTY; Monarchs Come To the Garden
  • PLUS: PRO BASKETBALL; Jordan Wins Use Of His Name
  • PLUS: PRO FOOTBALL -- DALLAS; Cunningham Joins The Cowboys
  • PLUS: PRO FOOTBALL -- GIANTS; Way to Direct Player Programs
  • PLUS: ROWING; Top-Seeded Rowers Advance at Trials
  • Police Officer Faces Charges In Shooting of Bronx Teenager
  • Police Review Initial Handling of Stabbing Case
  • POP AND JAZZ GUIDE
  • Procter & Gamble Shake-Up Follows Poor Profit Outlook
  • 'Profiling' Ruled Cause For Appeals
  • Prospect Is Not Impressive
  • Protecting Public Spaces
  • Protest on Fuel Price Slows Nigerian Cities
  • Public Interests; Cow Country Notes
  • PUBLIC LIVES
  • PUBLIC LIVES; A Do-Gooder and a Victim Not Forgotten
  • Putin Acts to Rule in Chechnya Even as Rebels Step Up Attacks
  • Putin to Visit North Korea; U.S. ABM Plan May Be Target
  • QUOTATION OF THE DAY
  • Reading Scores
  • Reporter's Notebook; Life Is Now a Fast-Forward Blur For America's Most Frequent Flier
  • Residential Real Estate; Doctor's Office: Apartment Bargain
  • The Roads a Woman Can Take
  • Ruling Limits Some Foster Parents' Rights
  • Schwab Enters Online Bond Trading Arena
  • SENATE APPROVES STEP TO OVERHAUL CAMPAIGN FINANCE
  • Services for William Simon
  • SOCCER: ROUNDUP; American Women Win in Australia
  • Some Kind of Remedy
  • SPARE TIMES
  • SPORTS BUSINESS; McMullen Moves On And Devils Stay Put
  • Sports of The Times; McMullen's Last Hurrah Postponed
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS: DEVILS VS. STARS; Belfour's Efforts in Goal Keep the Stars in the Game
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS: DEVILS VS. STARS; Brodeur's Brilliant Evening Is Wasted
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS: DEVILS VS. STARS; Devils Players Are Off the Shelf and Right on the Mark
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS: DEVILS VS. STARS; Fans Clamor for Tickets, and Respect
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS: DEVILS VS. STARS; Long Night, Longer Series
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS: DEVILS VS. STARS; Stevens Is the Devils' Blue-Line Stalwart
  • Summer Stockings, Almost
  • Sunbeam Sues PricewaterhouseCoopers
  • 'Survivor' Is a Strong Draw, Proving Itself a Hit for CBS
  • Tate & Lyle Sees Bleak Outlook
  • Teenage Mother Accused of Throwing Baby in River Was Depressed, Lawyer Says
  • Teenagers' Drug Use Rising, Survey Finds
  • TENNIS; Martinez and Pierce Advance to Final in Paris
  • TENNIS: NOTEBOOK; U.S. Open Tickets To Go on Sale
  • TENNIS; Pierce Gains French Open Final
  • Terrorist Logic
  • Texas Lawmakers Seek Wide DNA Testing
  • THEATER GUIDE
  • THEATER REVIEW; Sharpening Their Wits And a Few Other Things
  • Through the Looking Glass: Europe Raises Interest Rates
  • TRANSACTIONS
  • Transfer of General at Site of Anti-Gay Killing Is Protested
  • TV WEEKEND; A Boy-and-His-Dog Story In a More Innocent Era
  • U.S. VS. MICROSOFT: Pursuing a Giant; Retracing the Missteps In the Microsoft Defense
  • U.S. VS. MIRCROSOFT: THE CASE; Company Quickly Seeks A Stay of Judge's Order
  • U.S. VS. MIRCROSOFT: THE LAW; Experts Praise Judge's Rulings On Microsoft
  • U.S. VS. MIRCROSOFT: THE VIEW ABROAD; A Muted Reaction of Admiration and Disbelief
  • Vanguard Is Sued by the Owners of S.& P.
  • WEEKEND EXCURSION; Resurrecting the Miner's World
  • WEEKEND WARRIOR; Stalking the Bear (Bears Optional)
  • What About China?
  • White House Reports Trouble Retrieving Messages
  • Whitman Acts in Schools Dispute
  • Woman Killed by Commuter Bus
  • Work Begins on Westin Hotel To the West of Times Square
  • WORLD BRIEFING
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: AMERICAS; COREL TO CUT JOBS
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: AMERICAS; SOUTH AMERICAN PHONE VENTURE
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: ASIA; POSSIBLE JOINT BID FOR DAEWOO
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: ASIA; TRADE SPAT OVER GARLIC
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; BRITISH JOB CUTS ANNOUNCED
  • WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING: EUROPE; VIRGIN PLANS BIG PURCHASES
  • Young Is Expected to Retire
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN; CAMPAIGN BRIEFING
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: CAMPAIGN BRIEFING; TODAY'S SCHEDULES
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE CHEERLEADER; Earning A's in People Skills at Andover
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE TEXAS GOVERNOR; Bush Criticizes Gore Record On Trimming Bureaucracy
  • THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE VICE PRESIDENT; Gore Praises Move to Aid Salmon Run
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  • A Campaign Finance Muddle
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  • Access to RU-486
  • THE AD CAMPAIGN; First Lady as Promise Keeper
  • American Express Wins Bank Permit
  • Artists Jacob Lawrence And George Segal Die
  • As Zedillo Meets Clinton, U.S. Praises Vote Process
  • At the Mall, Shopping and Darwinism
  • Avoiding Child Support
  • Barak Facing Old Dilemma
  • BASEBALL; First Piazza Slams Clemens, and Then the Fans Do
  • BASEBALL; In Another Chance on the Main Stage in the Bronx, Piazza Thrives Again
  • BASEBALL: NOTES; Maddux Is Unbeaten In 7 Starts
  • BASEBALL; Old Pro Is Shown Up By Mets Rookie Tyner
  • BASEBALL: ROUNDUP; For 2nd Time in 4 Days, Justice Goes Deep Twice
  • The Big City; High Notes At the Home Of the C Note
  • Bombardier Gets Order From G.E. Division
  • Brazil Grants Some Legal Recognition to Same-Sex Couples
  • BRIDGE; Juniors Take a Loss and Then Nearly a Title
  • Budget Follies in New York
  • BUSINESS DIGEST
  • Cabdrivers Sue To End Policy On Suspensions
  • The Colossus of Redmond Suddenly Seems Human
  • Columbia Pictures Has New President
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  • COMPANY NEWS; ABBOTT LABORATORIES ANNOUNCES BUYBACK OF ITS STOCK
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  • COMPANY NEWS; SHARES OF MYLAN LABS, A DRUGMAKER, TUMBLE BY 26%
  • COMPANY NEWS; WESTMORELAND COAL IN TALKS TO ADD KNIFE RIVER MINES
  • CONNECTIONS; Swashbuckling Anarchists Try to Take the $; Out of Cyberspace
  • Corrections
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  • DANCE REVIEW; Getting Back to the Physical Impulse
  • Dead Birds Are a Portent Of Return of West Nile Virus
  • Discovering the Bright Side of Forgetting
  • Dot-Com Volunteer Finds Happiness
  • Drugmaker Wins a Round In Patent Case With Rival
  • East Harlem Shopping Center Snagged Over Financing of Garage
  • Economy May Have a Soft Spot; Swelling Trade Gap Worries Some Experts and Policy Makers
  • E.D.S. Shares Skid 26 Percent On Company's Sales Warning
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  • Fatal Fall Onto Rail Track
  • FOOTBALL; Lewis Rejoins the Ravens and Speaks of Ordeal
  • George Segal, Pop Sculptor, Dies at 75; Molded Plaster People of a Ghostly Angst
  • GOLF; Early Out and Comfortably In for Consistent Paulson
  • GOLF: ROUNDUP -- ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL; Eggeling Gets A Hole in One
  • Greece Vows Antiterror Action as British Victim's Widow Issues Plea
  • Guards Acquitted of Staging Gladiator-Style Fights
  • HOCKEY; Lowe to Stay With Oilers As the General Manager
  • HORSE RACING; Belmont's Biggest Question: Which Also-Ran Won't Be?
  • HORSE RACING; Finder's Fee Captures Acorn
  • HOUSE APPROVES A BILL TO REPEAL THE ESTATE TAX
  • House Rejects Bill Requiring Donor Disclosure
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  • In a Father's Care
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  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS; Japanese Economy Rose 2.4% in Quarter
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  • Israeli Interests
  • Jacob Lawrence Is Dead at 82; Vivid Painter Who Chronicled Odyssey of Black Americans
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  • THE MARKETS: COMMODITIES
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  • NEWS SUMMARY
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  • Paid Notice: Deaths BENTON, SINGER, MARIANNE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths BURNETT, MARY
  • Paid Notice: Deaths CLARK, BLAIR
  • Paid Notice: Deaths COULOUCOUNDIS, ANTHONY
  • Paid Notice: Deaths DRAPER, DOROTHY S.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FINKELSTEIN, AARON
  • Paid Notice: Deaths FURMAN, MARY H.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GOLDFINE, HERMAN
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GOLDSTEIN, DOROTHY K.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths GROSSMAN, JOSEPH
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HIRSHFIELD, LOUISE M.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LAWRENCE, JACOB
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MARKOWITZ, ALFRED
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MILSTOC, MAYER
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MORRIS, ROBERT I.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths PACE, DR. WILLIAM
  • Paid Notice: Deaths POLLOCK, JOHN L.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths RASKIN, HERMAN
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SCHULMAN, ROSALIND BLUM
  • Paid Notice: Deaths STEBBINS, JOSEPHINE SMALL
  • Paid Notice: Memorials BREMER, BILL
  • Paid Notice: Memorials POWELL, ANN B.
  • Paid Notice: Memorials ROSENBERG, BARBARA S.
  • Pakistan Outlines Plans To Curb Militant Networks
  • Parking Rules
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  • PLUS: COLLEGE BASEBALL -- WORLD SERIES; Stanford Beats Louisiana-Lafayette
  • PLUS: COLLEGE BASKETBALL -- ILLINOIS; Self Is Hired To Coach
  • PLUS: HOCKEY -- ISLANDERS; Cairns Signs 2-Year Contract
  • PLUS: PRO FOOTBALL -- SAN FRANCISCO; Young Sends 49ers Retirement Notice
  • PLUS: SOCCER -- EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS; Tournament Opens Today
  • PLUS: TRACK AND FIELD -- NEW YORK MINI MARATHON; Olympic Preview In 10-Kilometer Race
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  • PRO BASKETBALL; Penicheiro Dominates The Liberty
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  • SOCCER; Mutiny Emphatically Ends the MetroStars' Winning Streak
  • SPORTS OF THE TIMES; Defending Champions Find a Way to Win
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  • STANLEY CUP FINALS; Crestfallen, Devils Try to Regroup
  • STANLEY CUP FINALS; Stars Say Winning Gives Them Momentum
  • States Move Toward Easing Obstacles to DNA Testing
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  • TENNIS; Paris Final Is Set as Kuerten Rallies and Norman Breezes
  • Toward Cleaner Campaigns; A Setback on Section 527 Groups
  • Toward Cleaner Campaigns; Fattening Albany's Cats
  • TRANSACTIONS
  • Tsakane Journal; Apartheid Still Burdens A Girl Who Didn't Fit
  • TV SPORTS; ABC Made Most of Three Overtimes
  • Two Record Labels Settle Copyright Suit With MP3.com

Translated by Adrian Nathan West — Published on March 14, 2016

Published in Issue 43

A good portion of my paying work involves slogging through reams of contemporary Spanish fiction and writing reader’s reports, sample translations, and press dossiers. In general, the picture isn’t pretty. It’s true that, in any country, literary quality figures fairly low on the scale of what makes a book salable: that both publishers and agents tend to stress tried-and-true themes (World War II, a couple’s struggles with infertility, a crime that reveals hypocrisy in a small town, etc.), risible comparisons (the Lithuanian Sebald, the Maltese Virginia Woolf, a mix of Bolaño and Jeffrey Eugenides), and even grimmer things like a writer’s physical attractiveness. In Spain there are added problems with deep roots in the country’s history: a class structure that often favors the well-connected and mediocre; cultural politics that funnels funds and prizes to writers who express the correct views; and the heritage of the dictatorship, when little information flowed in and creators, confined largely to a national market, missed out on the major aesthetic currents of the twentieth century. Much has changed, but much hasn’t: the best-seller lists remain crowded with books lacking in appeal to foreign markets, and higher-brow writers are praised for pastiches so transparent as to merit pillory.

Germán Sierra’s work is a rare exception. A respected neuroscientist at the University of Santiago de Compostela, he is one of a small group of writers to have considered in earnest the challenges contemporary science presents to the narrative model that has come down to us from the nineteenth century, with its emphasis on the sovereign role of individual psychology as an engine of plot. He brings to mind Philip K. Dick, but less speculative, more uncanny, and tinged with a hard-edged griminess reminiscent of Darby Crash–era Los Angeles.

Another, perhaps minor point, but one that counts for a great deal in an era when fewer and fewer people manage to master the basic mechanics of style: Sierra writes well. His prose is clean, he doesn’t repeat himself, and he dispenses with the kind of mundanities and bloated, pseudo-philosophical digressions that plague so much Spanish fiction in the present day. Nothing in his books is excess, and nothing looks unpolished. Most of all, there is no trace of self-indulgence.

Standards, his most recent book, was published in 2013 by Pálido Fuego, home to Lars Iyer, Robert Coover, and David Foster Wallace. This is fitting company for Sierra, a member of the so-called “Nocilla Generation,” which introduced Spanish audiences to a model of writing characterized by quick shifts in register, collage-like overlays of seemingly disparate details and events, and a critical, but also fatalistic relationship to technology. Vicente Luis Mora described Standards as being “L.A. Confidential filmed by David Cronenberg,” and while such a description falls short of exhausting the book’s allure, style, or depth, it does give a sense of its lurid pull and its eerily apt blending of the cerebral and the macabre.

Standards opens by coupling the gastronomical refinement of the modern gourmand with the yearning for communion and ritual in the “ice suicide club,” when an Argentine hypnotist, after a long period of nourishing himself exclusively on vegetables, exercising an hour a day, sleeping eight hours nightly and foregoing sexual relations, sends out maps to a location where invitees can come to dine on his dead body, which is packed in snow. In accordance with the laws of the market, this once-exclusive luxury becomes democratized, and soon cannibalism is another faddish indulgence for the in-crowd, like pour-over coffee or fugu sashimi. In the book’s early pages, a down-at-heel rocker and his companion, two of the book’s major characters, sit down for a meal of human flesh along with other hedonists grown bored of more accessible pleasures. Later, the musician finds himself near Central Park as one woman pulls a gun on another, her exact replica. Silence reigns amid the towering stores, the designer bags and designer shoes, and locals and tourists take out their cellphones to record whatever it is that is happening—whether it is a crime or a work of art, no one seems to know or care—and project it for the millions of eyes glued to YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. Numerous critics have observed that Nocilla Generation writing approximates the experience of channel surfing, aiming for a state of constant, low-level agitation; here, Sierra documents the moral stupor of the overexposed media subject, who has become a conduit for pure spectacle, neither capable of or interested in distinguishing the import of what is passing before his eyes.

In the next chapter, a radiologist shows a video of the event to a surgeon colleague, asking him, “Is it one of ours?” “I don’t think so,” he replies. “Could be from Singapore, or Las Vegas, or Bombay. I think they’ve made a few of those in Bombay.” The channel changes, and Sierra offers vignettes of an eighteenth century sculptor obsessed with the ideal rendering of human flesh in stone; Soviet cosmonauts who contemplate the ideal of the New Man; a doctor, inspired by Nabokov, researching therapies that will lead to eternal youth; shady scientists and government operatives meeting over drinks in a Swiss bar; and an assassin standing over his prey in a hotel room.

Searching for hidden resonances between technical and cultural innovation, Sierra draws together a dense web of figures, some fictional, some real, in an intrigue that culminates in a fictionalized history of plastic surgery. The ossification of canons of beauty thereby implied converges with other technologies—holographs, organ regeneration—to offer, like Manuel de Landa’s robot historian in War in the Age of Intelligent Machines, an account of evolution in which humanity is not the end, but merely the necessary catalyst for a series of scientific processes giving rise to the cyborg-like life forms that will succeed it. The Trojan Horse, appropriate for a time when a majority of young people in English-speaking countries list becoming famous as their primary life goal, is a consultancy called the Clones Agency:

In simple terms, the Clones Agency represents everyone who look like a certain celebrity and would like to exploit that similarity in a professional capacity, whether in public relations, pornography, or prostitution.

Sierra visualizes a moment when the advantages conferred by genetic variation become a liability, and the diverse forms of life drop away. Standardization of the physical body brings with it a diminishment of inner life, a slow blunting of love, care, ambition, and the longing for community into the synthetic values of the post-human world. The clash of sinister and tawdry that accompanies this process proves an ideal backdrop for Sierra’s meditations on individuality, its possible eclipse, and what opportunities for resistance remain when the allegedly insurrectionary possibilities of instantaneous global communication have themselves become a ruse of capital.

—Adrian Nathan West


THE FASHION

The fashion, they assure us, had its origin in some remote Scandinavian hideaway; from thence came the custom of keeping the dining room far below ambient temperature and offering, in the middle of the month of August, a leather jacket to the customers, as in those bars constructed of ice blocks where they sip vodka and dine on caviar. The ritual recalls other conceits of underground gastronomy such as, for example, the consumption of species on the road to extinction. Refinements deriving their attraction from the excitement of the concealed, the furtive, the esoteric, the illegal. Thai restaurants that cook sea turtles in their shells, hidden like opium dens amid the shanties of the most improbable quarters of Bangkok, where exquisite tourists with their feet sunk in the repugnant muck of the street, their John Lobbs or Christian Louboutins in hand, pants rolled up or evening dresses gathered over the knees, walk behind the local guides. Secret taverns with passwords, peepholes and tough guys packed into every cellar, every back room, during the cinematographically glorious years of the prohibition. Shamans’ cabins in the middle of the jungle where the gods descend temporarily to earth over the surface of a bowl of ayahuasca. Dark dives with industrial music where, on certain nights of the month, provided the client knows the password, it is possible to drink cocktails prepared with authentic human blood.

During the first decades of the twentieth century, prior to its secret expansion through the various capitals of Europe, the fashion seems only to have been known among a small group of initiates who called themselves the ice suicide club: a circle of friends, legend has it, who had received identical missives in which, under a hand-drawn map and a list of geographical coordinates, the Argentine hypnotist César Ripa explained how he had set about dying in a specific place in the middle of nowhere, lost in the sea of white and fascinated by the absence or inaccessibility of his shadow, trusting that his body would be perfectly preserved when they went to pick it up. To contrive that his muscles should constitute a delight for the palate, César Ripa had fed himself exclusively on vegetables and had exercised an hour every morning upon waking for several years. He had slept eight hours each day, winter or summer. He had abstained from sexual relations, ignored the woman with the barbarous cobalt stare who generally accompanied him at his spectacles. And he hoped that, by following precisely the instructions on the map, they could find him and enjoy the extraordinary pleasure of feeding on his flesh.

From then forward, at the same time as the custom of being hypnotized—immersed in that enchanting dream from which the recently born middle class hoped to glimpse the truth or the spirit realm—began to fade, for the same reasons of boredom that had led to its popularity, the idea of dying in the snow and being consumed by kin and intimates began, slowly and discreetly, to catch on: grown-up men and women, when they arrived at the decision that to continue living was no longer worth the bother, would head, first in their sleds or boats, later in extravagant automobiles capable of cutting a trail through those glistening wastelands, to solitary redoubts where they would set their vehicles aflame and tread over the crackling frozen foam until the weariness and numbness produced by hypothermia impeded their going any further. Taking care, always, to avoid any possible witnesses. There they would build a tomb of ice and enclose themselves in its interior, to keep from being devoured by wolves, stretching themselves out nude to die like arctic monarchs, Nazi psychopaths, or videogame protagonists, waiting for their comrades to come and recover their crystallized remains, shimmering like gemstones and brittle as steel.

Nonetheless, the rumors that establish a link between the growing popularity of this custom and the European Black Metal renaissance are absolutely unfounded.

Now, apart from the cold, there is nothing extreme, uncanny, or luxurious in the décor. It’s expensive, naturally, since there is a paucity of raw materials, but not so much of one, for demand never exceeds supply. As with every extravagance available for purchase, there are fewer extravagant persons in attendance than one might be led to believe. In fiction, it is generally represented as the outgrowth of madness or an extreme indulgence for eccentric millionaires who have already tried everything—snuff films, cryogenics, extreme surgery, trips to outer space; nonetheless, it can hardly be said to be costly, in fantasy terms it is rather like a visit from a high-class prostitute to a hotel room. What began as a rite wound up becoming a caprice comparable to buildering, playing paintball with the guys from the office, or urban speleology in the sewer tunnels.

Though there are some groups of three or four, it is almost always young couples who pamper themselves with the excitement of the forbidden; large groups are too indiscreet, and in general, they are looked down upon. The clients are not particularly elegant in appearance, and the cuisine is as simple as the setting itself: thin strips of red meat stretched out on a tray of white porcelain over a tablecloth that is white as well. In the center of the table is a grill, so that all may prepare their meal to their liking. No complicated sauces, no sophisticated garnishes, only course salt and a bit of mustard, as with Wagyu beef. Billy Globus (2006) remarks that he hadn’t expected the flavor to be so similar to pork, while Christine Ticq brightens the room with her struck-match smile. The ice is black as leather. It’s been a long time since they’ve seen one another, but unlike Billy Globus, Christine hasn’t gotten fatter in the interim, or lost hair, nor does the skin sag under her eyes, and she hasn’t yet stopped earning her living by exploiting her most noteworthy talent. “Why don’t you play in public?” she asks Billy. “I’m not good enough . . .”

“I have to answer a few mails,” Billy Globus responds to the question that emerges broken from the bed, from among a pile of lavender-colored chocolate shavings scattered over the pillow.

“Fine.”

“I have to post a couple of tweets.”

“Cool, Billy, but don’t leave.”

“I need to put a couple of things up on my blog.”

“You can’t do it later? It’s six in the morning.”

He needs to see the number of views his video’s gotten on YouTube. Not too many. His best concert, the one where he played “Woolwood” for the first time in public, and afterward “Improvisation Around Sweet Jane.” Seventeen minutes of video later digitalized, with a soundtrack that left a good deal to be desired. The video is filmed from the third or fourth row, and for that reason, once in a while, it focuses on one of the spectators, and there she is, Christine Ticq, fifteen years younger but exactly the same as today. Billy Globus watches the film without sound, so that she won’t hear. He watches it to see the woman who is lying in his bed, to observe her face while she listens to him play, that concentration, so cold, so inexpressive, as if wishing to prevent the least movement of her face from imposing itself between the music and her perception of the music. A pristine stretched canvas receiving the caresses of the brush. He thinks of waiting a few minute and filming her while she sleeps, but in the end, he doesn’t dare, or he thinks he wouldn’t dare to copy the film later on, that there is something terribly intimate in the face as it is molded by its dreams.

When they go out, the traces of apoptosis can be seen left and right. The dismembered neighborhood stinks of dried trash, and the dead light seeps arterially from the black gashes in the asphalt. “Now we can talk business,” Christine concedes, and explains to him that this is, without a doubt, the prime moment to sell. In a few years, all those properties his father gave him will be worth a third or a fourth of their present value. If he leaves it in her hands, she could get him enough money to never have to work for the rest of his life.

Two young men identical to Brad Pitt are playing basketball in a parking lot, under an enormous billboard with the image of an actress in her forties and the slogan of Morelli Cosmetics: YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE. They look like two insects of the same species—two beings of the same brand—engaging in a courtship dance. At dawn, one of them will have to go to Sydney, where a photo session awaits him in a restaurant that has just been opened. The other will catch a plane to film a soft-drink ad in Bangkok. Billy Globus hails a taxi to head to his apartment in Brooklyn. “Should I drop you somewhere?” he asks Christine. “No thanks, I’d rather go walking… I’d like to hear you play again some day. Hear you play ‘Woolwood.’” Halfway over the bridge, all the sounds of Manhattan mix together into the usual roar of a subterranean beast. Every city has its chant, the product of the cacophonic compounding of millions od distinct noises, and Billy Globus is capable of listening separately to many of those independent voices as he travels through the streets. In Manhattan there are meridian echoes, those of the great north-south avenues, and parallel voices on the east-west streets; there, in the vestibule of a glass building, a chorus of nearly albino children sings, the chimneys gust, the ladies’ high heels clack against the sidewalk, everyone bellows into their mobile phones, the taxis shake, and the workshops and factories, the printers hum, the air conditioners whistle, the doors and windows creak, some sing, others shout at the drivers and the passersby, the horns honk, the policemen’s sirens wail. The vibration of the subway is like a hairdryer’s blowing on the cords of an electric bass. Hundreds of urban rhythms that people like Billy Globus are capable of turning into music.

In the heart of Manhattan, someone takes a pistol from a handbag, just in front of the glass cathedral consecrated to Steve Jobs, as the clock strikes the hour to shop till you drop. An Austrian, the type that never flinches. It’s now how it was before Giuliani’s reforms, when things like this happened anywhere: now, on this corner, uniformed policemen are calm as they shepherd along this ecosystem of hairdos, hats, and baseball caps. C’mon, c’mon, c’mon! But everything happens in an instant. The multitude flows through its natural streambed from 5th Avenue to 58th and 59h Street, the buyers follow the current up or down, rowing against the turbulence with their black bags from Barney’s or Chanel, the brown ones from Louis Vuitton, the white ones from Gucci, the blue ones from Tiffany, origami ones from Takashimaya and the transparent ones from . Only the people closest by can see the weapon, but no one howls from panic or throws themselves to the ground, as is commonly seen in films; on the contrary, they all step away silently with the vectoral coordination of a swarm, a flock of starlings, or a shoal of anchovies, though it is those who are a bit further away and cannot make out which is the woman who is carrying the weapon who are most afraid, at first. She is young, very slender, very succinctly dressed, nailed to the ground by a pair of excessively tall, excessively sharp high heels, an exaggerated mane of blond hair, so straight as to appear starched. Her build seems to fragile for the Glock held with determination in her bony arm, which forms a 90 degree angle to her body; a gesture not evocative of a practiced gunslinger. As we know from television, such a pose makes it nearly impossible to hit the target, no matter how close it is, which means, if she decides to pull the trigger, she could accidently wound a random passerby. Particularly if the weapon happens to be automatic—which seems doubtful both to tourists from the world’s four corners as well as the New Yorkers themselves (accustomed to a great variety of spectacles in the streets) as soon as they realize that the girl with the weapon is walking intently toward her paralyzed counterpart, whom the crowd has slowly pulled away from, and they see that the second girl is identical to the first, and that both are the same person they had all just seen a few seconds before, amplified a hundred times and plastered on the side of a building a little further down on Fifth or a little further up on Madison; at the same moment they begin to become conscious of the situation (hardly a few seconds have passed before the agent closest by begins to react, but he is still unsure which action to take), the hundreds of people surrounding these enigmatic specular antagonists have taken their cellphones and still and video cameras from their cases, holsters, and sleeves and have multiplied the pair of twins, the one who aims and the one who comprises her target, into an infinity of metacopies soon to voyage off through cyberspace. They are the ones, those staring in unison, who are massacring themselves in a circle, depicting the scene and depicting one another like the eye of a pixelated hurricane, simultaneously confirming: 1) that their weapons are faster, and 2) that the copy is not perfect—something already perceived by the most expert shoppers, because, despite their striking physical similarity, while the one is clad in Proenza Schouler, Rodarte, and Jimmy Choo, the other sports Target and, at most, something from Brooks Brothers. And it is precisely these specialists, aware of this monstrous stylistic asymmetry, who begin to intuit that what is taking place before their eyes may be, not a publicity reel or a scene from a reality show, but an actually unforeseen occurrence; that the pistol, in other words, might be real. And they begin to feel panic or fascination, to make a hollow amid those who are filming and gawking, to slither off (or come closer in order to witness to what was presumably a historic event: a few blocks up, on the other side of Central Park, is where John Lennon had been shot), making way with their bags from Barney’s, Bergdorf Goodman, Gucci, Chanel, Tiffany, and , turning their backs on the scene playing out beneath the reflections of Steve Jobs’s orthogonal bubble, meeting eyes with the officers from the NYPD who head into the center of the whirlwind, trying to warn them that something horrible is going to happen, while the identical but divergently dressed women seemed to hypnotize one another like to venomous beasts conscious of their capacity to annihilate (and it seems irrelevant that only one of them is actually armed). And then, a second before the police can act, the one bearing the weapon lets it fall to the ground and the other approaches and embraces her as if nothing had happened at all, as if running into her mirror image on Fifth Avenue were something completely natural, as if appearing between the sights of a gun lacked the least importance, or had even been necessary, essential in order to insert an asymmetrical element into the composition, s a sign of respect for the original on behalf of the copy.

One might say that the possibility of producing and of being reproduced reveals to us the fundamental poverty of being: that something could be repeated means that this power seems to propose a lack in being, and that being is lacking in a richness that would not allow it to be repeated, Maurice Blanchot writes in Museum Sickness

Germán Sierra is a neuroscientist and fiction writer from Spain. He has published five novels: El espacio aparentemente perdido (Debate, 1996), La felicidad no da el dinero (Debate, 1999), Efectos secundarios, (Debate, 2000), Intente usar otras palabras (Mondadori, 2009), and Standards (Pálido Fuego, 2013). He is also the author of the book of short stories Alto voltaje (Mondadori, 2004). Adrian Nathan West is the author of the forthcoming Aesthetics of Degradation (Repeater Books) as well as the translator of numerous works of contemporary European literature. His writing and translations have appeared in many journals in print and online, including McSweeney’s, the Times Literary Supplement, Words Without Borders, and Asymptote, where he is a contributing editor. He lives between Spain and the United Stated with the cinema critic Beatriz Leal Riesco.

Excerpt courtesy of the author

Published in Issue 43

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  1. German Autumn by Stig DagermanStig Dagerman, the wunderkind of Swedish literature in the ten years before he committed suicide in 1954, was on assignment from the Swedish newspaper Expressen when he traveled around Germany in the autumn of 1946. These objective dispatches, now published in the U.S. for the first time, are laden with...

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