1 Yozshur

Cse 205 Assignment 9-1

// Assignment #: 9 // Description: Assignment 9 Recursion import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStreamReader; import java.util.ArrayList; public class Assignment9 { public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { InputStreamReader in = new InputStreamReader(System.in); BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(in); ArrayList<Integer> myArray = new ArrayList<Integer>(); int[] numbers; try { while (reader != null) { String line = reader.readLine(); Integer val = Integer.valueOf(line); myArray.add(val); if (val == 0) break; } } catch (IOException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } numbers = new int[myArray.size()]; for (int i = 0; i < myArray.size(); i++) { numbers[i] = myArray.get(i); } int min = findMin(numbers, 0, numbers.length - 1); // min will be the minimun value return from Method findMin int compBy3 = computeSumDivibleBy3(numbers, 0, numbers.length - 1); // compBy3 will be the sum of all numbers divisible by 3 return from Method computeSumDivibleBy3


designs and convert a design in UML to the equivalent code. 2. ... Java Foundations, Introduction to Program Design and Data Structures, by John Lewis , Peter.

CSE205 Object Oriented Programming and Data Structures  Syllabus ­ Spring 2012 Instructor(s) and Office Hours Instructor:  Mutsumi Nakamura  Office: BYENG (BrickYard ENGineering wing) 520 (5th floor)  Phone: 965­1757  E­mail: [email protected]  Office hours: Monday and Wednesday 3:45pm­4:45pm at Coor L1­60 (except January 25th, Coor L1­60 3:30pm­ 4:20pm) Friday 1pm­2:30pm at Coor L1­38  or by appointment (If these hours are not convenient, I will be happy to make an appointment to meet with you at other times.)  Please check the course website for the current office hours as they might change. TA (Teaching Assistants):   To be Announced. Please see “Lab Schedule” in the course website.

Catalog Description Problem solving by programming with an object­oriented programming language. Introduction to data structures. Overview of computer science topics.

Course Objectives and Outcomes 1.      To introduce issues related to software development  1.1.   A student can define the terms of software engineering (software life cycle, software improvement models)  1.2.   A student can use object­oriented design techniques to identify classes and objects and define the relationships among objects. 1.3.   A student can understand simple UML (Unified Modeling Language) diagrams to represent OO designs and convert a design in UML to the equivalent code. 2.      To introduce concepts of data structure organization  2.1.   A student can write code using basic data structures such as ArrayLists/Vectors.  2.2.   A student can implement basic data structures such as linked lists, queues, stacks and binary trees. 2.3.   A student can determine the appropriate basic data structures to use in a program. 2.4.   A student can use encapsulation to provide abstract container classes  2.5.   A student can write a program using sequential and text files as input and output for programs 3.      To introduce Object Oriented language constructs  3.1.   A student can design and implement a simple GUI (graphical user interfaces) 3.2.   A student can write a program using inheritance, interfaces, and polymorphism. 3.3.   A student can use exception handling correctly in a program.

4.      To introduce the issues of Algorithms  4.1.   A student can describe the efficiency of simple algorithms (merge sort, quick sort, linear search, binary search).  4.2.   A student can apply standard algorithms for searching and sorting, searching when designing programs.  4.3.   A student can design recursive algorithms and use recursive structures when designing programs. 5.      To introduce social and ethical issues of computer science  5.1.   A student can research and discuss ethical and social issues of the computing world

Major Topics Covered in this Java­based Course 1. Object­Oriented Software Development Brief introduction to Java Classes, Interfaces, Abstract classes Polymorphism Introduction to GUI 2. Introduction to Data Structures Arraylist Linked lists Stacks Queues Introduction to binary trees 3. Algorithms Recursion Searching/sorting Big O notation 4. Exceptions and Input/Output streams Exception handling File read/write Serialization

Lecture Hours Lecture 1: MWF 9:40am­10:30am Lecture 2: TTh 9:00am­10:15am  Lecture 3: TTh 10:30am­11:45am  Lecture 4: MW 2:00pm­3:15pm   Web Site http://myasucourses.asu.edu/ login and look for CSE205 course page. To be able to login to the myASU site, you need to have an ASURITE account. Activating your ASURITE UserID is a self­service process. You can activate your account by visiting the ASURITE Activation Web site  (https://selfsub.asu.edu/apps/WebObjects/ASURITEActivation/)

There is a link from the above site to the following site (this site can be accessed without going through myASU site): http://courses.eas.asu.edu/cse205/spr12/ To see notes, announcements, assignments, and exam dates.

Prerequisites CSE 110 (Java). If you feel that you already know the materials of this course, you can test out the course by taking a comprehensive exam. For more information, please contact the instructor.  More information can be found here.

Textbook(s) Java Foundations, Introduction to Program Design and Data Structures, by John Lewis, Peter DePasquale, Joseph Chase, including a CD, ISBN: 0­321­42972­8, 9

  Grading The grading scheme is broken down as follows: Item Number of Items Exams and Final 4 Assignments 9­13 Attendance ? Total

Point Value 100 20 ?

Percent of Final Grade 60% 40% 5% 105%

Exams There will be three exams and one final. The lowest scored exam will be dropped. There will be absolutely no make­up exams. (If you happen to miss an exam, that will be the one to be dropped.) Your picture ID needs to be shown during the exams.

You can calculate your own standing by using the following formula:  (60%)*(YET + Final Score ­ the lowest exam score)/(3*100)+(40%)*YAT/(TNA*20)+(5%)*YQT/MQT where: YET = Your Exams Total  YAT = Your Assignments Total  TNA = Total number of Assignments YQT = Your Quiz Total MQT = Maximum Quiz Total Exam dates Exam1 ­ Wednesday, February 8th Exam2 ­ Wednesday, March 14th Exam3 ­ Wednesday, April 18th Final Exam Lecture 4 (MW 2:00pm section) ­ Monday, April 30th, 12:10pm­2:00pm   Assignments This class is meant to be a programming­intensive class. This is accomplished through the programming assignments that are assigned every week or two. These are not small projects that can be started the night before they are due. You will need to spend some time designing your project before you even begin to do any coding. Part of your program's grade will be calculated automatically by our submission server. This requires that your program output information in a very specific way and that it also handles invalid input gracefully. Your program is expected to pass the submission site tests or you will lose those points. During the first week of class, we will cover some methods and tools for ensuring that your program is working properly. Finally, all submitted files are expected to have a standard header at the top with your information: (in each file)   // Assignment #: //         Name: //    StudentID: //      Lecture: //  Description: (Description of each file/class)

Here is the grading schema for those assignments: Number of Items 1 4

Point Value 2 2

Total Point Value 2 8

Documentation

1

4

4

Indentation

1

1

1

Space

1

1

1

Item Compilation Test Cases

Description Program compiles Automated test cases Program is well­documented Indentation makes program easy to read Spacing makes program easy to read

Classes and methods Total

1

4

4

Required classes and methods

20

No late assignment is accepted. Attendance Attending class is important in order for you to be aware of what is going on. Often, announcements will be made or information will be discussed that is not available on the web site. Announcements in the class take precedence over printed material. Your attendance grade may be determined by sign­in sheets or in­class exercises that are given out randomly. Grade Breakdown Final Grade A+

Percentage >= 97%

A B+

>= 90% and = 87% and = 80% and = 77 and = 70% and = 60% and 

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *